What’s the first thing that comes to your mind when you come across a job opening with a higher salary and better growth prospects?

Fine! In simple words, Do you want to apply for a job which is better than your present one in every way?

What are the inhibitions you face?

I know what you’re thinking. You might be wondering about the problems you’ll face if your RESUME gets accepted and you get a call for an interview.

The mere thought of informing your boss about this might send shivers down your spine and make you apprehensive regarding it.

But, is there a way you can handle this situation efficiently?

Let’s discover the answer to this question in the discussion below.Managing or Attend interviews

Should you tell your Boss?

Before answering this question, let me ask, are you in good terms with your boss?

If yes, then without lying use words like “appointment” or “commitment” that don’t invite a big bunch of questions and aren’t untrue at the same time.

The problem with making medical excuses is that after a few attempts, they lose credibility, especially if you look fit and fine. So avoid them as much as you can.

But, what if the boss is downright strict and can’t be reasoned with?

In this case you can try going for excuses which can vary from being circumstantial to personal.

Need of a break due to acute depression, issues relating to relationships, a family problem etc, are some personal issues you can make use of. Though unconventional, but these are the only alternatives viable for you.

Avoid Using Office hours:

stop wasting time It is quite understandable that the office hours occupy most of your daytime. But, it is highly unethical to use your office time to apply for jobs and schedule interviews. Stay off work board while you’re on the clock.

Avoid using your official mail address and company fax to communicate with the hiring manager you are scheduling an interview with.

It goes without saying, but if your current boss catches you engaging in any of these activities, you may find yourself with days and months of free time.

Avoid unnecessary discussion with your co-workers regarding the interview:

A basic yet significant point to be remembered while managing job interviews is having less or no discussion with your colleagues until it becomes necessary.

Obviously, you don’t want your boss to hear about it from someone else. Hence, avoid any unnecessary discussion and keep things to yourself until you get selected.

Scheduling the interview:

Talk to the hiring manager and ask for an appointment in the morning or early evening to reduce the absence time to a minimum.

Be direct with your employer about scheduling the interview before or after regular business hours. Most of the employers understand this point and might get ready to have a meeting outside normal working hours.

They might also respect your ethical behavior and the integrity you are maintaining by taking your present job seriously.

Be Honest to the Hiring Manager:

mentor The hiring manager might ask if your current boss knows of the job search and interview. Make sure you are honest and say a clear NO.

Ask him to contact your former bosses for references, as you’re keeping your interview confidential at this point of time. Lying could result in your boss getting to know about it through a reference check, which obviously won’t be in your favor.

Remain Optimistic:

Whether you are being interviewed for a potential position or networking at a professional level, keep in mind not to disparage your current boss.

You’ll obviously have to give a valid reason for switching the job, but while doing so, stay positive. Rather than speaking ill of him/ her, lay due stress on your desires to find a position where you can utilize your talent and skills to produce results.

Interviewing for a job while working in an organization might seem like a daunting and fearful experience. But you need not feel apprehensive, all will be good and in your favor, if you’re on the right track.

Author Bio: Anshuman Kukreti is a professional writer and a keen follower of the global job market. An engineer by qualification and an artist at heart, he writes on various topics relating to employment across the globe. Currently he is working for Naukrigulf

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