You want to attach your picture on resume, so that it complements resume. But all you would hear and read in the web is that you should absolutely avoid using a photo to get an interview call. But just think for a while.

Deliberate upon the numerous explanations given for not using a photo in your curriculum vitae. Will you abide by this golden rule of avoiding your image that will destroy your chances of getting hired? Well, let’s see.

Here, today we will discuss and bring forth different facets of the argument. We will moderate upon the pros and cons, the consequences and studies subsequently. It depends upon how we perceive it.

photo on resume yes or noIs It Good to Put a Picture on Resume?

The avant-garde age of technology has made it a priority to attach our photo online. Be it on a social networking site like Facebook or a professional one like LinkedIn. So, don’t we put it on LinkedIn? We do. But let’s not be hasty and bring ourselves to conclusion. Consider its facets to decide whether to put or not.

1. A photo that can play you in or out any way:

A professional looking photo of you attached to your resume can do wonders of getting you an interview call. Now, that totally depends on how you look in the photo and how it perceives in the mind of the recruiters. Studies have showed that 20% of attractive professional overlooking resumes have better chances to be selected for interviews.

If considered the other side of it, we can very well deduce that a photo might play foul. It can project a negative impression. The hiring committee is not supposed to be prejudiced by color, race, and religion. They would rather know a candidate by his resume than by knowing him by his photo.

Now cases have come to the front of outright rejection of candidates after interview. One can sue the company for not selecting on the basis of discrimination. Thus, the companies might avoid interviewing a candidate with an attached photograph.

  • A recent study has showed that under the Australian law it is illegal on the part of a company to know the age, color, race, marital status and religion of a candidate prior to an interview. Now this Law is absolutely subjective to the Australian government.

2. Technology at its best:

technology in resume Now it can play at our sides or turn the tables on us. The claim is that if someone wants to put his/her image in resume, they can do so, but with prior caution. As the format of a resume goes, it is appropriate to have a 2 page curriculum vitae. It shouldn’t exceed that.

A photo can claim more space, which would lead to tightly knitted words explaining skills and qualification. So, you can shrink the photo and keep it no larger than a stamp-size photo in your resume.

Technology has its bad side:

The application tracking system screens the resumes online and then sends it to the recruiters for further screening. By the time your resume comes out of the electronic screening system, your photo might be scrambled. So, for some, putting the photo might not be that wise.

ATS at risk:

The application tracking system might be at risk of getting jammed by screening a tightly worded resume which has presumably been caused due to a photograph. Screening of highly digital format of resumes can be quite onerous for the system. Recruiters might cancel out such digitally advanced formats.

Machine to be blamed:

Few companies have machines to scan and screen the resumes and feed to computers. A resume with a photograph could be declined by the machine. A machine which has been fed with data to accept resumes without images, which most of the companies prefer, might actually reject imaged resumes.

3. You might be a subject to Discrimination:

You never know who is scanning your resume, whether it is a Caucasian, an African or an Asian. Different people have different preferences. You might be a victim of discrimination and never get a call for interview, let alone not being hired. You might be judged even before you show your worth to your potential employer in the interview.

The photo is not the only one which goes under the radar. Let’s face the facts here. You are good-looking but lack the skills for the job. For starters, you might even get a call for interview. But then what? If you lack the skills that the recruiters are searching, then you might never get hired.

But the fact that personality counts is always true. If you look professional in your photo, and it turns out that you bear the qualification that the company is seeking, you will surely get a call. No one misses a chance of hiring a full-on personality of looks and profession.

4. Your looks might give away your true potential:

resume photo You must have heard the saying, “You look what you are from inside” and that does not necessarily mean that if you are handsome or beautiful, your personality also rocks. Your thoughts should be sophisticated for you to look the same.

If a face reflects integrity and dedication, then a company will surely recruit such a person. You don’t have to be exceptionally attractive to bag a position; it has nothing to do with good looks. But then, there is indeed something about looks and how you maintain your personality. A company will never hire a grossly shabby individual, though he might possess the requisites of a better employee.

5. A resume where photo is an essential:

You are applying for being a model for a well-based company or you want to get involved in main-stream media and entertainment. It is a necessity that you provide your photo along with your curriculum vitae. Indeed you have to be presentable enough to look attractive. Your personality accounts for maximum in such fields.

The age is digital. We cannot stop recruiters to look around for us after they receive our application. That is what they are going to do. If you want to put a photo, go for it. But before progressing headlong, make it a point that your photo does not violate the protocols set. Here are few suggestions to go for.

It doesn’t matter anyway:

If you want to attach your photo, go for it. Your potential employer is going to run a deep background check over you before giving a call. And that includes all your social and professional networking sites. Your Facebook or Twitter account might give way to loads of your personal images that can deflate your chances. So, there’s no harm in being a bit careful before applying to a job. Update your profiles online before you upload your resume.

The more professional it looks, the better it is:

You can attach your photo to your resume, as you now have an upper hand benefit of getting a call for interview. Your chances are better than those who send it without a photograph. But make sure that the photo you provide should be professional and descent. That shouldn’t be just any of your random chic photo or a formal passport photo. The photo should be in background with the job you are applying. With lighter or natural background you can optimize your image.

The age is advancing, so why lag around?

This is the age of technology and pictures. Just consider how boring it would be without any GIFs, colors and images. Now in an earlier article we discussed how creatively you web your way into getting hired. Without the digital world, creativity might fall short. You want to impress the hiring manger at the desk.

Now how to do that? Make a digital resume that delineates you and your activities in the most professional manner possible. The pictures can make your resume come alive. You can even add GIFs to it to insinuate humor. Thanks to Leonardo Da Vinci for carving out the first resume in human history, and it is evolving since then.

The claim still goes on that it all depends upon what you consider after deliberating on perceptions of looking at things. But, there is still some good things hidden in putting images and graphics in your resume.

Your photo might actually bag attention. When everything online is visual, resume with pictures will only add to its charm. You are sophisticated, professional and know your way in the ladder of success. A professional photo might augment your chances of etching a firsthand impression upon the hiring staff.

Give us your feedback. Did you actually go with a photo? Share with us your stories.